Spring 2014 — A note about revision to syllabi

Posted on February 1, 2014 by 

Folks:

If you see this update, know that Prof. McGovern will be posting revisions to this site by Sunday evening (2-2-2014).   Each class is in a slightly different place in the curriculum, so be sure to consult the correct section.  Also, I will try to email all students the same revisions.  Pleae check your suny rcc.edu email.  Thanks!  See you next week.

Advertisements
Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Spring 2014 — A note about revision to syllabi

Folks:

If you see this update, know that Prof. McGovern will be posting revisions to this site by Sunday evening (2-2-2014).   Each class is in a slightly different place in the curriculum, so be sure to consult the correct section.  Also, I will try to email all students the same revisions.  Pleae check your suny rcc.edu email.  Thanks!  See you next week.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Top Ten Ways Disney Corrupts Children

Top 10 Ways Disney Corrupts Children

 

Link | Posted on by | Leave a comment

ENG 207: Short Story

Final updates for December:

Next class, December 5:  please read “The Other Side of the Hedge” by E.M. Forster (pp. 47-53) and 

“The Man Higher Up” by O. Henry (pp. 181-193).

Next week, on December 10, please bring your drafts for the final reading response!

Each paper should be about 500 words and related to any ONE story we have read between

11/14 (“Luvina” and “The Miracle of the Birds”) up to the two stories for our next class:  by O’Henry & Forster

(as per class decision).  In other words, you may write a response to any one story between 11/14 and 12/5.

Peer critique — scheudled for Tuesday, 12/10.

Submit final papers — Thursday, 12/12

There will also be two short forms for students to complete re:

the class itself (ENG 207) and an instructor evaluations.

Thanks for your cooperation!

I wish you all the best during break and happy holidays!

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Works Cited entry samples for the Internet, an anthology, or an interview

From the Internet

Last name, first.  “Title.”  Web host.  Date posted.  Date retrieved.  Web.

(Please note the URL is no longer included in the paper or on the Works Cited.)

From an anthology:

Silko, Leslie Marmon.  “Landscape, History, and the Pueblo Imagination.”  Writing

         Nature. Ed. Carolyn Ross.  New York : St. Martin’s Press, 1995.  381-393.  Print.

The final word (in the entry) describes the format of delivery:  Print, Web, DVD, or Personal or Phone Interview are the primary examples.

For an interview:

Last, first.  Personal (or phone) interview.  Date of interview.

Remember, parts of the whole are in quotation marks — e.g., essay titles, the title of a newspaper or journal article, while the whole work (entire book, newspaper, journal) will be placed in italics.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Comma and semi-colon rules (review) from Purdue Owl

Please use the link below to visit the site —

If it does not load, simply go to the Purdue Owl section on punctuation.

Almost EVERYONE could use a review of comma rules.

90-Second Semicolon” vidcast series on the Purdue OWL YouTube Channel.

Commas are used

1.  After an introductory word or phrase

Ex.  Therefore, they left the party giddy.

2.  Around non-essential clauses

Ex.   The Spanish professor, in the puce, three-piece suit, seems creative.

3.  Between city and state — and between month date, and year

Ex.  145 College Road, Suffern, NY

December 1, 2013 marks World AIDS Day.

4.  Before a conjunction to join two independent clauses:

He eats like a bear, and he is almost as hairy!

 

In the United Kingdom, semi-colons are frequently used before a conjunction.  But in the US, we use a comma + a conjunction to join two complete ideas instead .  Conjunctions to couple with a comma include: and,but, for, nor, or, so and yet.

 

5.  Use a semi-colon to joing together two complete ideas that are related (either to extand an idea or to demonstrat contrast).

The winter is beautiful; however, I prefer summer.

 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Works Cited page (instructions and samples)

MLA Bibliography

Rules and Samples

If a complete date is given, write it in the order: Day Month Year. If no publication date is indicated, write n.d.
Altonn, Helen. “Marine Team Sounds Alarm for Reefs.” StarBulletin.com. Star Bulletin,

[INDENT 5/tab]  29  Aug. 2008. Web. 17 June 2009.

“Hawaii Drunk Driving Statistics.” Alcohol Alert. KeRo, 2009. Web. 17 Mar. 2009.

Holahan, Catherine. “Eddie Bauer Files for Bankruptcy.” MSN Money. Microsoft,

[INDENT 5/tab]  17 June 2009. Web. 17 June 2009.

Landau, Elizabeth. “CDC: Swine Flu Viruses in U.S. and Mexico Match.” CNN Health.com.

[INDENT 5/tab]  Cable News Network, 25 Apr. 2009. Web. 17 June 2009.

Lehrman, Lewis E. Lincoln at Peoria. Lincoln Institute, n.d. Web. 17 June 2009.

More details re:  Works Cited page, by Grace Fleming
1. Type “Works Cited” one inch from the top of your page. This measurement is pretty standard for a word processor, so you shouldn’t have to make any page set-up adjustments–just start typing.
2. Type in the information for each source, double spacing the entire page. Alphabetize the works by author. If there is no author or editor mentioned, use the title.

3. Once you have a complete list, you will format so that you have hanging indents. To do this: highlight the entries, then go to FORMAT and PARAGRAPH. Somewhere in the menu (normally under SPECIAL), find the term HANGING and select it.

4. To insert page numbers, place your cursor on the first page of your text, or the page where you want your page numbers to begin. Go to View and select Header and Footer. A box will appear at the top and the bottom of your page. Type your last name in the top header box before the page numbers and right justify.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment